With nearly 13,000 American workers injured each day, establishing a safety program should be a priority for every business. But most small business safety efforts lack formal planning and training, according to Nationwide’s fourth annual Business Owner Survey released on Wednesday (June 6, 2018).


The use of emerging technology to improve workplace safety is significantly more prevalent in businesses with Millennial-age owners

32% | Percentage of all business owners using various types of technology to improve workplace safety
71% | Percentage of Millennial-age business owners using various types of technology to improve workplace safety

Comparative (all business owners vs. Millennial-age owners) look at specific types of technology for improving workplace safety

Building sensors | Devices that detect humidity, temperature, water leaks and equipment failure

16% | Percentage of all business owners using this technology
36% | Percentage of Millennial business owners using this technology

Wearables | Watches, belts and other personal sensors that can detect physical strain

13% | Percentage of all business owners using this technology
32% | Percentage of Millennial business owners using this technology

Drones | Commercial drones used to reach or inspect areas that otherwise are dangerous for workers

7% | Percentage of all business owners using this technology
21% | Percentage of Millennial business owners using this technology

Vehicle telematics | Technology that can help reduce distracted driving

11% | Percentage of all business owners using this technology
20% | Percentage of Millennial business owners using this technology


Ways to improve workplace safety programs and reduce overall expenses

  • Employ or identify a person who is charged with the company’s safety and implementing safety-related initiatives.
  • Provide formal safety training to all employees on a regular basis.
  • Implement a formal return-to-work program to help injured employees get back to meaningful work as soon and as safely as possible.

“While technology can enhance workplace safety, it’s not a panacea,” said Mark McGhiey, associate vice president of Nationwide’s Loss Control Services, the sponsor of the survey. “There’s always going to be an element of human-driven effort to ensure workers can do their jobs safely and efficiently.


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