UPDATE | This listing is an update of our 2018 state minimum wage information.

What is the minimum wage for 2019?

The minimum wage rate is the lowest hourly pay that can be awarded to workers. The following information includes current state and federal minimum wage rates, exceptions, and scheduled increases.

map of usa

Federal Minimum Wage 

Note | Some employees are exempt from minimum wage requirements; for example, employees who are tipped, like restaurant servers. 

The current federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour. It has not increased since July 2009. However, many states, cities, and counties have a higher minimum wage rate. When a state, city or county minimum wage rate is higher than the federal rate, employers are required to pay workers the higher amount. 

State Minimum Wage Rates 

Twenty-nine states and D.C. have a minimum wage higher than the federal minimum wage ($7.25 per hour):

Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington, Washington D.C., and West Virginia. 

State Minimum Wages

  • Alabama: $7.25 (Federal Minimum Wage, no state minimum)
  • Alaska: $9.84 (Annual indexing has begun)
  • Arizona: $11.00
  • Arkansas: $9.25
  • California: $12
  • Colorado: $11.10
  • Connecticut: $10.10
  • Delaware: $9.25
  • District of Columbia: $14.00 (as of 7/1/19)
  • Florida: $8.25
  • Georgia:$7.25 ($5.15 if not covered by federal regulations)
  • Guam: $8.25
  • Hawaii: $10.10 
  • Idaho: $7.25
  • Illinois: $8.25 
  • Indiana: $7.25
  • Iowa: $7.25 
  • Kansas: $7.25
  • Kentucky: $7.25
  • Louisiana: $7.25 (Federal Minimum Wage, no state minimum)
  • Maine: $11 
  • Maryland: $10.10 
  • Massachusetts: $12
  • Michigan: $10.00
  • Minnesota: Large employers are required to pay workers $9.86/hour and small employers (less than 500k in annual sales) $8.04
  • Mississippi: $7.25 (Federal Minimum Wage, no state minimum)
  • Missouri: $8.60
  • Montana: $8.50 ($4 for businesses with gross annual sales of $110,000 or less) (Annual indexing has begun)
  • Nebraska: $9 
  • Nevada: $8.25 
  •  New Hampshire: $7.25 (Federal Minimum Wage)
  • New Jersey: $8.85
  • New Mexico: $7.50
  • New York: $11.10
  • North Carolina: $7.25 
  • North Dakota: $7.25
  • Ohio: $8.55 
  • Oklahoma: $7.25
  • Oregon: $11.25 (7/1/19)
  • Pennsylvania: $7.25
  • Puerto Rico: $7.25
  • Rhode Island: $10.50 
  • South Carolina: $7.25 (Federal Minimum Wage, no state minimum)
  • South Dakota: $9.10
  • Tennessee: $7.25 (Federal Minimum Wage, no state minimum)
  • Texas: $7.25
  • Utah: $7.25
  • Vermont: $10.78 
  • Virgin Islands: $10.50
  • Virginia: $7.25
  • Washington: $12.00
  • West Virginia: $8.75
  • Wisconsin: $7.25
  • Wyoming: $7.25 ($5.15 if federal regulations do not apply)

Higher minimum wages exist in many cities and counties  

According to the Economic Policy Institute, 42 localities have adopted minimum wages above their state minimum wage. Check out the excellent interactive chart from the Economic Policy Institute for information about each jurisdiction.

  • Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Belmont, California
  • Berkeley, California
  • Bernalillo County, New Mexico
  • Birmingham, Alabama
  • Chicago, Illinois
  • Cook County, Illinois
  • Cupertino, California
  • El Cerrito, California
  • Emeryville, California
  • Flagstaff, Arizona
  • Las Cruces, New Mexico
  • Los Altos, California
  • Los Angeles County, California
  • Los Angeles, California
  • Malibu, California
  • Milpitas, California
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Montgomery County, Maryland
  • Mountain View, California
  • Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester Counties, New York
  • New York City, New York
  • Oakland, California
  • Palo Alto, California
  • Pasadena, California
  • Portland Urban Growth Boundary, Oregon
  • Portland, Maine
  • Prince George’s County, Maryland
  • Richmond, California
  • San Diego, California
  • San Francisco, California
  • San Jose, California
  • San Leandro, California
  • San Mateo, California
  • Santa Clara, California
  • Santa Fe City, New Mexico
  • Santa Fe County, New Mexico
  • Santa Monica, California
  • SeaTac, Washington
  • Seattle, Washington
  • Sunnyvale. California
  • Tacoma, Washington

Information provided by the Economic Policy Institute, the National Conference of State Legislatures, and the Labor Law Center.

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