Now that open enrollment for health insurance has started and, well, crashed, it’s still a good reminder to all of us that healthy workers are more productive. They write better code and meet deadlines on schedule. Or, at least that’s what they say when leaving the office for a company softball game.

Here are some ways to stay fit around the office, no matter when the HealthTrust.gov programmers get their site working.:

1. Field an office team.

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(Image: atomische at flickr.com)

Find a sport that many of your employees enjoy, then research to see if there’s an adult league in town. Team sports like softball, soccer or basketball build fitness and camaraderie. If team sports aren’t feasible, organize periodic company outings such as hikes in local parks.

2. Increase awareness.

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(Image: wadebrooks at flickr.com)

Devices like the Fitbit can show employees how little they get up and move around at work. These sophisticated gadgets let people set personal activity goals and track their performance. Studies show that 88% of users become more active after starting to use these devices.

A plus–the [email protected] program can help lower the cost of insurance for all employees.

3. Encourage employees to take breaks.

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(Image: ehiuomo at flickr.com)

Making your employees feel like they need to be in the office all day encourages a sedentary office culture. Let your employees know it’s ok to get up and take a short walk when they’re feeling unproductive (instead of sitting and checking Facebook or Twitter).

4. Step up to standing or treadmill desks.

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(Image: headlinesandheros at flickr.com of Lifespan Treadmill Desk)

Standing desks discourage long hours of sitting and staring at a computer, and treadmill desks allow employees the option of walking at a slow pace while working. Staying active raises your metabolism, which makes burning calories easier.

5. Bring exercise into the office.

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(Image: tonyfulgueiras at flickr.com)

If you have space, consider having in-office yoga or Pilates classes. Tight on room? Start a lunch hour walking group. Or add bike parking so workers can pedal to the office. (Hint: A shower or two at work might encourage workers to exercise more often.)

The 150-Year History of the Term ‘Small Business’

Until the end of the 19th century, there were few big businesses so the history of the term “small business” is less than 150 years. Today, no other phrase comes close to describing companies up to 500 employees.